Kudzu Bugs

Megacopta cribraria

The Kudzu bug is native to Asia, but has been recently introduced to the United States. These agricultural pests may migrate towards exterior walls with lots of sunlight in late fall, or early winter. Many homeowners find them due to the scent left behind by their chemical defense.

The kudzu bug is also known as:

  • Bean plataspid
  • Kudzu beetle
  • Globular stink bug

Biological Profile


  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Hemiptera
  • Family: Plataspidae
  • Genus: Megacopta

How common are they?

The Kudzu bug is native to Asia, but has been recently introduced to the United States. Current spread includes the southeastern US, primary Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina. Specimens have also been found in neighboring states, such as Alabama, Florida, Tennessee, and Virginia. 

Health Risks


  • Known diseases: None
  • Bites: No
  • Stings: No

How dangerous are they?

Kudzu bugs rely on a chemical defense. When poked or prodded, they’ll release a strong-smelling substance. If this substance comes into contact with skin, and is left unwashed, it can result in welts or rashes.

Kudzu bugs do not bite, sting, or pinch.

Pest Treatment Factors


  • Cost: Low
  • DIY-Friendly: Yes
  • Lifestyle Impact: Minimal

How hard are they to get rid of?

Exclusion is the primary method of elimination for Kudzu bugs. Most infestations can be removed through a two-step process:

  1. Vacuuming, or capturing all known specimens indoors.
  2. Sealing cracks, crevices, and other entry points into the home using caulk, or putty.

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